Local Headlines

Danbury State Representative David Arconti, co-chairman of the General Assembly’s Energy and Technology Committee, said he’s concerned the uptick in infections appears to coincide with parts of the city that were without electricity for multiple days following the recent tropical storm.

He says that's the downtown area in particular.  Arconti says the health department has heat map tracking capabilities and noticed the trend.

Arconti said he has reached out to the Connecticut Department of Public Health to determine if there have been more COVID-19 cases in other parts of the state where electricity was knocked out for long periods, especially in densely populated neighborhoods where there may be more multi-generational households.

Lamont said that might be “a canary in a coal mine” to determine if there may be more cases in other communities.

Arconti says Connecticut has known about the dangers of this pandemic since at least March, and storm season is the same time of year every year.  He wants to question utility officials at his hearing on Thursday about what they did to prepare for a natural disaster amid a pandemic.  Arconti specifically wants to know how storm management plans changed over the last 5 months, if at all.  He noted that they can't assume anything when it comes to the utilities, so doesn't know if they made other provisions knowing that municipalities would not be opening emergency shelters.

Eversource was responding to people on Twitter concerned with the heat wave and lack of power, that they should stay with friends or family.  Arconti says that's something the state Department of Public Health has been advising against--not gathering with people outside of one's own household.

On Air Now
Red Eye Radio
Videos
Local Headlines