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Researchers are continuing their work on the Battle of Ridgefield Project.  A North Salem Road homeowner recently asked that their property be included in the survey because the historic home is near the location where the British army stopped to rest and feed their men, not far from the First Engagement between British forces and American troops.  Dr. Kevin McBride and Dr. David Naumec used metal detectors in the yard, looking for lead, brass, and iron objects that may be related to the battle. After a day working  archeologists dug upwards of 100 objects, only three of which appeared to be battle-related.  They were a  brass musket trigger guard fragment, a portion of an early iron frying pan known as a “spider,” and a pewter button.  The location of those artifacts was logged and the items were removed for conservation and analysis.  Dozens of battlefield surveys are planned in the coming year as the Historical Society obtains additional landholder permissions and applies for a second round of National Park Service funding to conduct a systematic archeological study of the April 27, 1777 Battle of Ridgefield. A typical battlefield survey of a private home includes hours of scanning the landscape with metal detectors. 

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Todd Schnitt
Local Headlines